Fairtrade group calls for re-think on banana prices

Gazette: Fairtrade group calls for re-think on banana prices Fairtrade group calls for re-think on banana prices

CAMPAIGNERS are urging the Government to stop supermarkets selling bananas at “scandalously low prices”.

Members of Colchester and Wivenhoe Fairtrade Town Group are urging shoppers to sign the group’s petition, which will be sent to Business Secretary, Vince Cable.

The group says while the low prices may be good for the consumer, they bad for the farmer, who cannot make enough money to feed a family.

On Saturday, more than 50 shoppers penned their support for the campaign in just 90 minutes at the Co-op, in The Avenue, Wivenhoe.

Comments (5)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

1:35pm Wed 12 Mar 14

wearebeingwatched says...

Yeah lets put the price up, so I cannot afford to feed my family!
Yeah lets put the price up, so I cannot afford to feed my family! wearebeingwatched
  • Score: 4

1:56pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Say It As It Is OK? says...

If people feel so strongly then they should only buy fairtrade foods, whatever fairtrade is? It is rarely fairtrade for many Third world producing counties.

What they should not do is try to enforce their will on to others.
If people feel so strongly then they should only buy fairtrade foods, whatever fairtrade is? It is rarely fairtrade for many Third world producing counties. What they should not do is try to enforce their will on to others. Say It As It Is OK?
  • Score: 7

3:50pm Wed 12 Mar 14

romantic says...

Supermarkets have the power to bulk buy and sell cheap(er), not just for bananas but for many other products. We as consumers have the choice on whether to buy from them, or from local grocers and markets. I go to the grocers and find it is cheaper, and also leads to less waste. But that's my choice.

Supermarkets want uniform products that they can sell right across all their stores, which means huge contracts, which means big suppliers. The supermarkets operate at an "arm's length" distance, meaning they tend not to look too closely at the workers at the primary stage of supply unless pushed to by pressure. Their suppliers are put under huge pressure to meet requirements of price, but also of shape, colour etc. They have a massive supply of labour, and so have not much incentive to look after their workers. The supermarkets are the ones with the power here. If they say to suppliers that workers must be properly looked after, and check it, and act on it if not done, they are the ones with the bulk-buying power to have that influence.

The same happens with milk, chickens, almost any foodstuff really.

When milk sells at £1 for 4 pints, the people losing are not the supermarkets, but the dairy farmers. When chickens sell for £3, it is because they have lived in a crowded barn. Whether this matters to you is a matter of choice, ultimately.

The only way to change this is in the language they understand: buy the Fairtrade stuff, buy from grocers, grow your own (obviously not bananas!). Eat less processed stuff full of salt, sugar etc. Cook from scratch and teach kids to do the same. Food is a massive issue in the world, and to a major extent, we have become disconnected from how it is supplied. Yet, at the same time, (and many will not believe this, but it's true), food is cheaper now as a % of income than ever before, and we waste huge amounts of it along the supply chain from farm to fridge.
Supermarkets have the power to bulk buy and sell cheap(er), not just for bananas but for many other products. We as consumers have the choice on whether to buy from them, or from local grocers and markets. I go to the grocers and find it is cheaper, and also leads to less waste. But that's my choice. Supermarkets want uniform products that they can sell right across all their stores, which means huge contracts, which means big suppliers. The supermarkets operate at an "arm's length" distance, meaning they tend not to look too closely at the workers at the primary stage of supply unless pushed to by pressure. Their suppliers are put under huge pressure to meet requirements of price, but also of shape, colour etc. They have a massive supply of labour, and so have not much incentive to look after their workers. The supermarkets are the ones with the power here. If they say to suppliers that workers must be properly looked after, and check it, and act on it if not done, they are the ones with the bulk-buying power to have that influence. The same happens with milk, chickens, almost any foodstuff really. When milk sells at £1 for 4 pints, the people losing are not the supermarkets, but the dairy farmers. When chickens sell for £3, it is because they have lived in a crowded barn. Whether this matters to you is a matter of choice, ultimately. The only way to change this is in the language they understand: buy the Fairtrade stuff, buy from grocers, grow your own (obviously not bananas!). Eat less processed stuff full of salt, sugar etc. Cook from scratch and teach kids to do the same. Food is a massive issue in the world, and to a major extent, we have become disconnected from how it is supplied. Yet, at the same time, (and many will not believe this, but it's true), food is cheaper now as a % of income than ever before, and we waste huge amounts of it along the supply chain from farm to fridge. romantic
  • Score: 4

5:21pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Ritchie_Hicks says...

Putting the price up will no doubt reduce demand, which will also affect the farmers. Perhaps it's the producers who need to address their profit margins?
Putting the price up will no doubt reduce demand, which will also affect the farmers. Perhaps it's the producers who need to address their profit margins? Ritchie_Hicks
  • Score: 1

12:36am Thu 13 Mar 14

Boris says...

Most of our bananas come from massive US corporations such as Chiquita, Dole, Del Monte, etc. Workers on their plantations work in conditions close to slavery. In one of the biggest banana producing countries, Colombia, anyone who attempts to set up a trade union, to demand better working conditions, is likely to be murdered. This is the reality behind the bananas that we Europeans are so happy to consume.
Most of our bananas come from massive US corporations such as Chiquita, Dole, Del Monte, etc. Workers on their plantations work in conditions close to slavery. In one of the biggest banana producing countries, Colombia, anyone who attempts to set up a trade union, to demand better working conditions, is likely to be murdered. This is the reality behind the bananas that we Europeans are so happy to consume. Boris
  • Score: 2

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree