Royal oaks given to Colchester

ROYAL oak trees have been given to the borough of Colchester.

Colchester Council has received the saplings from the Royal Estate after 12 open spaces were designated Queen Elizabeth II Fields.

The park’s department is now looking for schools to get involved and care for the saplings until they are big enough to plant.

The twelve designated spaces are in:
• Elmwood Avenue, Shrub End
• Gosbecks Archaeological Park
• Henrietta Close, Wivenhoe Cross
• Hilly Fields
• Irvine Road
• Magnolia Drive, Greenstead
• Mill Road Recreation Ground, Mile End
Monkwick open space
• Salary Brook, Parsons Heath
• St John’s open space
• Tile House Farm, Great Horkesley
• Mile End Sports Ground

Comments (2)

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8:06am Wed 28 Nov 12

hughie-s says...

Elmwood Avenue is on St Michaels
Couldn't Queenie spare an elm??
Elmwood Avenue is on St Michaels Couldn't Queenie spare an elm?? hughie-s

1:02pm Wed 28 Nov 12

sandgronun64 says...

hughie-s wrote:
Elmwood Avenue is on St Michaels
Couldn't Queenie spare an elm??
You have evidently never heard of Ophiostoma novo-ulmi (AKA Dutch Elm Disease) that devastated elm populations, particularly those native to the UK. Once a tree reaches circa 5 m (15ft) in height, it is vulnerable.

As far as I remember, the Queen's elms died out at the same time that other 'London elms' died out.There are resistant strains available from (I believe) King and Co., but this is not the Royal estate.

Perhaps if you want elms on Elmwood Avenue, it might be an idea to Contact CBC Parks and recreation Services to see if they can obtain a resistant strain, and how some community involvement regarding its planting and maintenance could be agreed? Even if a native (resistant clone) is not available, one of the non-native elm species (that do not succumb to the disease) such as Ulmus 'Sapporo Autumn Gold,' might be appropriate.
[quote][p][bold]hughie-s[/bold] wrote: Elmwood Avenue is on St Michaels Couldn't Queenie spare an elm??[/p][/quote]You have evidently never heard of Ophiostoma novo-ulmi (AKA Dutch Elm Disease) that devastated elm populations, particularly those native to the UK. Once a tree reaches circa 5 m (15ft) in height, it is vulnerable. As far as I remember, the Queen's elms died out at the same time that other 'London elms' died out.There are resistant strains available from (I believe) King and Co., but this is not the Royal estate. Perhaps if you want elms on Elmwood Avenue, it might be an idea to Contact CBC Parks and recreation Services to see if they can obtain a resistant strain, and how some community involvement regarding its planting and maintenance could be agreed? Even if a native (resistant clone) is not available, one of the non-native elm species (that do not succumb to the disease) such as Ulmus 'Sapporo Autumn Gold,' might be appropriate. sandgronun64

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