On the 8th March 2022, this years International Women’s Day, a candle-lit walk was held in memory of women who have died at the hands of domestic violence. The event was organised by a local initiative, 'Eye of Boudica' (www.eyeofboudica.org), in which many students from the inclusive-feminist society at a Colchester College were invited to partake and make speeches. Wallace-Brown details:

“My ambitions regarding street/sexual harassment and violence against women and girls are to educate and empower women and young people to stand up for themselves. To claim their autonomy and take up space. I have given talks on this recently at 2 events in celebration of Women’s History month and International Women’s Day.  In Southend and in Chelmsford. 
 
The focus for the march was firstly to draw attention to the number of women killed at the hands of violence and to remember these women. They have names and stories and they were more than just statistics.  It was also to bring together women and young people in our community to mobilise and start having these conversations about  change.  My community awareness campaign, Eye of Boudica is about moving away from the narrative of victim and saying ‘ENOUGH!’.  I have done at least a dozen trainings in the last year on standing up to hassment and being an active bystander and I share what I’ve learned at various speaking opportunities.  I’m currently working on developing workshops based on what I have learned and put into practice in everyday life.
 
Something that is paramount in bringing about change is listening to women and young people but also talking with local police, politicians, councillors, and ensuring that we have a voice in community safety initiatives.  It’s also about changing this list of do’s and don’ts that are always directed at women.  We have enough safety work to worry about as part of every day life. Why not focus on changing attitudes toward women and girls.
harassment and being an active bystander and I share what I’ve learned at various speaking opportunities.  I’m currently working on developing workshops based on what I have learned and put into practice in everyday life.
 
Something that is paramount in bringing about change is listening to women and young people but also talking with local police, politicians, councillors, and ensuring that we have a voice in community safety initiatives.  It’s also about changing this list of do’s and don’ts that are always directed at women.  We have enough safety work to worry about as part of every day life. Why not focus on changing attitudes toward women and girls.”

A student who attended the walk and made a powerful speech, Josephine Bursell, explains her passions on supporting the future of young girls and bringing change within our local community: 

“I am a proud feminist who wanted to surround myself with other people who felt the same. Our work helps us make a change in the college community, but also allows us to make a difference in the wider community; like at the march. I’m so tired of the injustices faced by teenage girls, and after experiencing them first hand and hearing our friend’s similar stories, the society was so glad to have an opportunity to honour the lives of women lost at the hands of men and to speak out about the injustices we face. It was wonderful to see people of all ages and gender there, and everybody’s enthusiasm and respect was heart-warming and empowering.”
-Josephine Bursell

The key message to be taken from the words of these women, and the words shared across time by women, is that they must be heard but more importantly listened to.