Missoula bar opening hours extended until 3.30am

Missoula bar opening hours extended until 3.30am

Missoula bar opening hours extended until 3.30am

First published in News

A town centre bar will be allowed to open until 3.30am at weekends despite fears it will lead to increased disorder.

Missoula, in Head Street, has successfully applied for permission to open for an extra hour every night.

Colchester Council received objections to the proposals on the grounds the extended hours could lead to noise disturbance.

Austin Baines, of Colchester Civic Society, said: “The area is already subjected to much stress in the early hours and to grant consent will only serve to increase this.”

In a statement to planners, the bar’s owner said: “There have been no complaints raised by neighbours or town centre residents to any activity taking place at this Missoula unit."

Full story in today's Gazette

Comments (9)

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1:37pm Tue 3 Jun 14

Shrubendlad says...

Madness!!!
Madness!!! Shrubendlad
  • Score: 1

2:26pm Tue 3 Jun 14

WitchofColchester says...

Oh, big whoop. So the bar opens for an extra hour- from 02:30 to 03:30 and opponents think this extra hour will lead to noise disturbance? Get real.
Oh, big whoop. So the bar opens for an extra hour- from 02:30 to 03:30 and opponents think this extra hour will lead to noise disturbance? Get real. WitchofColchester
  • Score: -2

3:13pm Tue 3 Jun 14

stevedawson says...

Can't see a reason to have any opening hr restrictions anyware.it's out dated and oppressive.the venues would ultimately regulate themselves.they are in the game to make money after all.this type of restriction of liberty has no place in our modern day society.
Can't see a reason to have any opening hr restrictions anyware.it's out dated and oppressive.the venues would ultimately regulate themselves.they are in the game to make money after all.this type of restriction of liberty has no place in our modern day society. stevedawson
  • Score: 4

4:05pm Tue 3 Jun 14

wormshero says...

I still think this is a good idea as kicking out time will be the same as the queen street clubs. Providing a different place to go will spread the crowd out and I would hope lead to less clashes in the overly populated queens street.
I still think this is a good idea as kicking out time will be the same as the queen street clubs. Providing a different place to go will spread the crowd out and I would hope lead to less clashes in the overly populated queens street. wormshero
  • Score: 5

11:01am Wed 4 Jun 14

zt00013 says...

The Colchester Civic Society campaigned against the Licensing Act 2003 and the organisation continues to attack flexible licensing hours because it promotes disorder and violence. This is in the face of evidence and elementary logic. Town and city centres across the country use to be far more violent than they are today as evidenced by recorded crime statistics and the BCS data. Forcing pubs, bars and clubs to close early means one thing that everyone drinks vast amounts quickly (especially at last orders) and then all leave en masse various establishments around the town centre. This drunken mass of people increases exponentially the chance of violence and accident. Later opening hours means people leave the town centre at various different times and thus there are fewer problems. Credit to the Civic Society for introducing the SOS bus but their regressive stance on licensing demonstrates why the council should pay no attention to them on such matters.

Colchester Town Centre is safe at night time, they are a few crimes (some violent) but you are still very unlikely to be a victim of crime. Noise pollution coming from the Town Centre is minimal and at any rate many people who live near or in the centre do so because they enjoy the hussle and bussle of the night time economy. At the very least people are aware of the night time economy before moving there and cannot claim ignorance. Walking down Lexden Road or Maldon Road at anywhere between 2-6 am and the roads are near enough empty, hardly the mania that some commentators allude to. It is a similar picture on Military Road on the other side of town. Missoula being open one hour later will have absolutely nil affect on local residents. It will boost the night time economy and that can only be a good thing.
The Colchester Civic Society campaigned against the Licensing Act 2003 and the organisation continues to attack flexible licensing hours because it promotes disorder and violence. This is in the face of evidence and elementary logic. Town and city centres across the country use to be far more violent than they are today as evidenced by recorded crime statistics and the BCS data. Forcing pubs, bars and clubs to close early means one thing that everyone drinks vast amounts quickly (especially at last orders) and then all leave en masse various establishments around the town centre. This drunken mass of people increases exponentially the chance of violence and accident. Later opening hours means people leave the town centre at various different times and thus there are fewer problems. Credit to the Civic Society for introducing the SOS bus but their regressive stance on licensing demonstrates why the council should pay no attention to them on such matters. Colchester Town Centre is safe at night time, they are a few crimes (some violent) but you are still very unlikely to be a victim of crime. Noise pollution coming from the Town Centre is minimal and at any rate many people who live near or in the centre do so because they enjoy the hussle and bussle of the night time economy. At the very least people are aware of the night time economy before moving there and cannot claim ignorance. Walking down Lexden Road or Maldon Road at anywhere between 2-6 am and the roads are near enough empty, hardly the mania that some commentators allude to. It is a similar picture on Military Road on the other side of town. Missoula being open one hour later will have absolutely nil affect on local residents. It will boost the night time economy and that can only be a good thing. zt00013
  • Score: 1

1:43pm Wed 4 Jun 14

LucyLane90 says...

I see way more trouble in Missoula than anywhere else in town, the doorman are so bloody rude
I see way more trouble in Missoula than anywhere else in town, the doorman are so bloody rude LucyLane90
  • Score: 0

7:18am Thu 5 Jun 14

Conspiracy Theory says...

zt00013 wrote:
The Colchester Civic Society campaigned against the Licensing Act 2003 and the organisation continues to attack flexible licensing hours because it promotes disorder and violence. This is in the face of evidence and elementary logic. Town and city centres across the country use to be far more violent than they are today as evidenced by recorded crime statistics and the BCS data. Forcing pubs, bars and clubs to close early means one thing that everyone drinks vast amounts quickly (especially at last orders) and then all leave en masse various establishments around the town centre. This drunken mass of people increases exponentially the chance of violence and accident. Later opening hours means people leave the town centre at various different times and thus there are fewer problems. Credit to the Civic Society for introducing the SOS bus but their regressive stance on licensing demonstrates why the council should pay no attention to them on such matters.

Colchester Town Centre is safe at night time, they are a few crimes (some violent) but you are still very unlikely to be a victim of crime. Noise pollution coming from the Town Centre is minimal and at any rate many people who live near or in the centre do so because they enjoy the hussle and bussle of the night time economy. At the very least people are aware of the night time economy before moving there and cannot claim ignorance. Walking down Lexden Road or Maldon Road at anywhere between 2-6 am and the roads are near enough empty, hardly the mania that some commentators allude to. It is a similar picture on Military Road on the other side of town. Missoula being open one hour later will have absolutely nil affect on local residents. It will boost the night time economy and that can only be a good thing.
LESS IS MORE PLEASE SEE BORIS ?
[quote][p][bold]zt00013[/bold] wrote: The Colchester Civic Society campaigned against the Licensing Act 2003 and the organisation continues to attack flexible licensing hours because it promotes disorder and violence. This is in the face of evidence and elementary logic. Town and city centres across the country use to be far more violent than they are today as evidenced by recorded crime statistics and the BCS data. Forcing pubs, bars and clubs to close early means one thing that everyone drinks vast amounts quickly (especially at last orders) and then all leave en masse various establishments around the town centre. This drunken mass of people increases exponentially the chance of violence and accident. Later opening hours means people leave the town centre at various different times and thus there are fewer problems. Credit to the Civic Society for introducing the SOS bus but their regressive stance on licensing demonstrates why the council should pay no attention to them on such matters. Colchester Town Centre is safe at night time, they are a few crimes (some violent) but you are still very unlikely to be a victim of crime. Noise pollution coming from the Town Centre is minimal and at any rate many people who live near or in the centre do so because they enjoy the hussle and bussle of the night time economy. At the very least people are aware of the night time economy before moving there and cannot claim ignorance. Walking down Lexden Road or Maldon Road at anywhere between 2-6 am and the roads are near enough empty, hardly the mania that some commentators allude to. It is a similar picture on Military Road on the other side of town. Missoula being open one hour later will have absolutely nil affect on local residents. It will boost the night time economy and that can only be a good thing.[/p][/quote]LESS IS MORE PLEASE SEE BORIS ? Conspiracy Theory
  • Score: 0

7:20am Thu 5 Jun 14

Conspiracy Theory says...

LucyLane90 wrote:
I see way more trouble in Missoula than anywhere else in town, the doorman are so bloody rude
I totally agree and S.I.A. Inspectors should visit the place more often.

FIT IS NOT FAT
FAT IS NOT FIT
Walk down the road, with your arms held out wide
YOU LOOK LIKE A TWIT.
AND A T*AT
[quote][p][bold]LucyLane90[/bold] wrote: I see way more trouble in Missoula than anywhere else in town, the doorman are so bloody rude[/p][/quote]I totally agree and S.I.A. Inspectors should visit the place more often. FIT IS NOT FAT FAT IS NOT FIT Walk down the road, with your arms held out wide YOU LOOK LIKE A TWIT. AND A T*AT Conspiracy Theory
  • Score: -1

7:24am Thu 5 Jun 14

Conspiracy Theory says...

stevedawson wrote:
Can't see a reason to have any opening hr restrictions anyware.it's out dated and oppressive.the venues would ultimately regulate themselves.they are in the game to make money after all.this type of restriction of liberty has no place in our modern day society.
That is not what you said about Layer Cake if I recall.
Do correct me !

And as a point this town cannot control drunks and miscreants, no drinking hole should be open after 1am.
[quote][p][bold]stevedawson[/bold] wrote: Can't see a reason to have any opening hr restrictions anyware.it's out dated and oppressive.the venues would ultimately regulate themselves.they are in the game to make money after all.this type of restriction of liberty has no place in our modern day society.[/p][/quote]That is not what you said about Layer Cake if I recall. Do correct me ! And as a point this town cannot control drunks and miscreants, no drinking hole should be open after 1am. Conspiracy Theory
  • Score: 0

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