Business leaders hit out at striking teachers

Business leaders hit out at striking teachers

Business leaders hit out at striking teachers

First published in News
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BUSINESS leaders and parents have hit out at striking teachers for disrupting the economy and putting children’s education at risk.

Teachers walked out from schools across north Essex yesterday in protest over changes to pay, pensions and working conditions.

Some 37 schools were closed across the county while 68 were partially closed.

More than 300 schools were open as usual.

Members of the National Union of Teachers said they “regretted” the disruption caused but also warned the long-term damage to the changes being brought forward by Education Secretary Michael Gove would be more damaging.

But Iain Wicks, Essex Development Manager for the Federation of Small Businesses, attacked strikers, saying: “If they regret it, why did they go through with it?"

SEE TOMORROW'S GAZETTE FOR THE FULL STORY

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5:08pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Mark Goacher says...

The views of one business group person hardly equates with business leaders lining up to condemn the strike. I was on strike today and have no regrets. The NUT took action because Mr Gove refuses to enter meaningful negotiations about the attacks on teachers' pensions and conditions. This was not a strike against parents it was a strike for parents and children as much as for us. Parents who use the non fee-paying sector have a right to the best in terms of well qualified, energetic and enthusiastic teachers. Making teachers work until 68, raiding our pensions, degrading pay and attacking conditions will simply put the better qualified off teaching in the state sector. Either they will go to the fee-paying sector or do something else with their qualifications. It is not in the interests of parents to have their children taught by poorly qualified teachers not up to the job or jaded old buffers staggering through ill-health to reach 68 (or later). If you want the best you have to pay for it. Mr Gove says that he wants all state schools to be as good as the very best private schools (where salaries are higher and holidays longer). So do we.
The views of one business group person hardly equates with business leaders lining up to condemn the strike. I was on strike today and have no regrets. The NUT took action because Mr Gove refuses to enter meaningful negotiations about the attacks on teachers' pensions and conditions. This was not a strike against parents it was a strike for parents and children as much as for us. Parents who use the non fee-paying sector have a right to the best in terms of well qualified, energetic and enthusiastic teachers. Making teachers work until 68, raiding our pensions, degrading pay and attacking conditions will simply put the better qualified off teaching in the state sector. Either they will go to the fee-paying sector or do something else with their qualifications. It is not in the interests of parents to have their children taught by poorly qualified teachers not up to the job or jaded old buffers staggering through ill-health to reach 68 (or later). If you want the best you have to pay for it. Mr Gove says that he wants all state schools to be as good as the very best private schools (where salaries are higher and holidays longer). So do we. Mark Goacher
  • Score: -1

5:50pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Carlosfandangles says...

Degrading pay? Come off it.........
Degrading pay? Come off it......... Carlosfandangles
  • Score: -1

6:15pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Mark Goacher says...

Carlosfandangles wrote:
Degrading pay? Come off it.........
A pay rise of 1% when inflation is 3% is a pay cut. Add to this an extra £100 pension contribution (to get less in the long run) and this amounts to a pay cut. I've calculated that the changes to my pension provision amount to a loss of £65,000. If someone broke into your house, trashed it, set fire to it on the way out and caused £65,000 worth of damage would you say: "Oh well, there's a recession on and burglars have to take difficult decisions?"
[quote][p][bold]Carlosfandangles[/bold] wrote: Degrading pay? Come off it.........[/p][/quote]A pay rise of 1% when inflation is 3% is a pay cut. Add to this an extra £100 pension contribution (to get less in the long run) and this amounts to a pay cut. I've calculated that the changes to my pension provision amount to a loss of £65,000. If someone broke into your house, trashed it, set fire to it on the way out and caused £65,000 worth of damage would you say: "Oh well, there's a recession on and burglars have to take difficult decisions?" Mark Goacher
  • Score: 0

7:45pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Boris says...

Iain Wicks should learn that schools are not a childminding service. They are there to educate children, and if teachers are turned away from their profession by the government's downgrading of their careers, they are not going to produce the well-educated workforce that the FSB would hope to see in the future.
Well done the teachers, let's hope your strike has the desired effect.
Iain Wicks should learn that schools are not a childminding service. They are there to educate children, and if teachers are turned away from their profession by the government's downgrading of their careers, they are not going to produce the well-educated workforce that the FSB would hope to see in the future. Well done the teachers, let's hope your strike has the desired effect. Boris
  • Score: -1

9:03pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Reginald47 says...

Mark Goacher wrote:
Carlosfandangles wrote: Degrading pay? Come off it.........
A pay rise of 1% when inflation is 3% is a pay cut. Add to this an extra £100 pension contribution (to get less in the long run) and this amounts to a pay cut. I've calculated that the changes to my pension provision amount to a loss of £65,000. If someone broke into your house, trashed it, set fire to it on the way out and caused £65,000 worth of damage would you say: "Oh well, there's a recession on and burglars have to take difficult decisions?"
No I wouldn't, but I wouldn't take it out on the kids next door either. You're supposed to be a teacher.
[quote][p][bold]Mark Goacher[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carlosfandangles[/bold] wrote: Degrading pay? Come off it.........[/p][/quote]A pay rise of 1% when inflation is 3% is a pay cut. Add to this an extra £100 pension contribution (to get less in the long run) and this amounts to a pay cut. I've calculated that the changes to my pension provision amount to a loss of £65,000. If someone broke into your house, trashed it, set fire to it on the way out and caused £65,000 worth of damage would you say: "Oh well, there's a recession on and burglars have to take difficult decisions?"[/p][/quote]No I wouldn't, but I wouldn't take it out on the kids next door either. You're supposed to be a teacher. Reginald47
  • Score: 2

9:32am Thu 27 Mar 14

Mark Goacher says...

Reginald47 wrote:
Mark Goacher wrote:
Carlosfandangles wrote: Degrading pay? Come off it.........
A pay rise of 1% when inflation is 3% is a pay cut. Add to this an extra £100 pension contribution (to get less in the long run) and this amounts to a pay cut. I've calculated that the changes to my pension provision amount to a loss of £65,000. If someone broke into your house, trashed it, set fire to it on the way out and caused £65,000 worth of damage would you say: "Oh well, there's a recession on and burglars have to take difficult decisions?"
No I wouldn't, but I wouldn't take it out on the kids next door either. You're supposed to be a teacher.
Yes I am. As such I am not going to set an example to 'the kids next door' that they should just passively accept it when they are attacked like a bunch of doe-eyed wusses. Neither am I prepared to sit back and see the quality of schools and colleges deteriorate so that 'the kids next door' get a dumbed down education on the cheap.
[quote][p][bold]Reginald47[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mark Goacher[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carlosfandangles[/bold] wrote: Degrading pay? Come off it.........[/p][/quote]A pay rise of 1% when inflation is 3% is a pay cut. Add to this an extra £100 pension contribution (to get less in the long run) and this amounts to a pay cut. I've calculated that the changes to my pension provision amount to a loss of £65,000. If someone broke into your house, trashed it, set fire to it on the way out and caused £65,000 worth of damage would you say: "Oh well, there's a recession on and burglars have to take difficult decisions?"[/p][/quote]No I wouldn't, but I wouldn't take it out on the kids next door either. You're supposed to be a teacher.[/p][/quote]Yes I am. As such I am not going to set an example to 'the kids next door' that they should just passively accept it when they are attacked like a bunch of doe-eyed wusses. Neither am I prepared to sit back and see the quality of schools and colleges deteriorate so that 'the kids next door' get a dumbed down education on the cheap. Mark Goacher
  • Score: 0

12:05pm Thu 27 Mar 14

Reginald47 says...

Mark Goacher wrote:
Reginald47 wrote:
Mark Goacher wrote:
Carlosfandangles wrote: Degrading pay? Come off it.........
A pay rise of 1% when inflation is 3% is a pay cut. Add to this an extra £100 pension contribution (to get less in the long run) and this amounts to a pay cut. I've calculated that the changes to my pension provision amount to a loss of £65,000. If someone broke into your house, trashed it, set fire to it on the way out and caused £65,000 worth of damage would you say: "Oh well, there's a recession on and burglars have to take difficult decisions?"
No I wouldn't, but I wouldn't take it out on the kids next door either. You're supposed to be a teacher.
Yes I am. As such I am not going to set an example to 'the kids next door' that they should just passively accept it when they are attacked like a bunch of doe-eyed wusses. Neither am I prepared to sit back and see the quality of schools and colleges deteriorate so that 'the kids next door' get a dumbed down education on the cheap.
But you are prepared to see 'the kids next door' go short of food because their mother couldn't work when you were on strike and didn't get paid! Fez up man, you may not get as much pay as you'd like, but you aren't exactly poor. Just selfish.
[quote][p][bold]Mark Goacher[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Reginald47[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mark Goacher[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carlosfandangles[/bold] wrote: Degrading pay? Come off it.........[/p][/quote]A pay rise of 1% when inflation is 3% is a pay cut. Add to this an extra £100 pension contribution (to get less in the long run) and this amounts to a pay cut. I've calculated that the changes to my pension provision amount to a loss of £65,000. If someone broke into your house, trashed it, set fire to it on the way out and caused £65,000 worth of damage would you say: "Oh well, there's a recession on and burglars have to take difficult decisions?"[/p][/quote]No I wouldn't, but I wouldn't take it out on the kids next door either. You're supposed to be a teacher.[/p][/quote]Yes I am. As such I am not going to set an example to 'the kids next door' that they should just passively accept it when they are attacked like a bunch of doe-eyed wusses. Neither am I prepared to sit back and see the quality of schools and colleges deteriorate so that 'the kids next door' get a dumbed down education on the cheap.[/p][/quote]But you are prepared to see 'the kids next door' go short of food because their mother couldn't work when you were on strike and didn't get paid! Fez up man, you may not get as much pay as you'd like, but you aren't exactly poor. Just selfish. Reginald47
  • Score: 2

2:13pm Thu 27 Mar 14

Jess Jephcott says...

Typical trade union attitude. Look after number one and sod the rest. If you don't like the job and the conditions of employment, go get another job. i would love the pension deal that you lot get at my expense.
Typical trade union attitude. Look after number one and sod the rest. If you don't like the job and the conditions of employment, go get another job. i would love the pension deal that you lot get at my expense. Jess Jephcott
  • Score: 1

4:33pm Thu 27 Mar 14

Mark Goacher says...

Reginald47 wrote:
Mark Goacher wrote:
Reginald47 wrote:
Mark Goacher wrote:
Carlosfandangles wrote: Degrading pay? Come off it.........
A pay rise of 1% when inflation is 3% is a pay cut. Add to this an extra £100 pension contribution (to get less in the long run) and this amounts to a pay cut. I've calculated that the changes to my pension provision amount to a loss of £65,000. If someone broke into your house, trashed it, set fire to it on the way out and caused £65,000 worth of damage would you say: "Oh well, there's a recession on and burglars have to take difficult decisions?"
No I wouldn't, but I wouldn't take it out on the kids next door either. You're supposed to be a teacher.
Yes I am. As such I am not going to set an example to 'the kids next door' that they should just passively accept it when they are attacked like a bunch of doe-eyed wusses. Neither am I prepared to sit back and see the quality of schools and colleges deteriorate so that 'the kids next door' get a dumbed down education on the cheap.
But you are prepared to see 'the kids next door' go short of food because their mother couldn't work when you were on strike and didn't get paid! Fez up man, you may not get as much pay as you'd like, but you aren't exactly poor. Just selfish.
If the 'kids next door' are in a situation where they starve because their mother goes without one day's pay then I think you should be asking the question of why this mother has been forced into a situation of working for such meagre wages. Who is it exactly who supports a situation where wages are driven down to such an extent that children 'go without food' if their mother has a day off? It isn't the teachers but the very politicians and 'business leaders' who condemn the strike.
[quote][p][bold]Reginald47[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mark Goacher[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Reginald47[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mark Goacher[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carlosfandangles[/bold] wrote: Degrading pay? Come off it.........[/p][/quote]A pay rise of 1% when inflation is 3% is a pay cut. Add to this an extra £100 pension contribution (to get less in the long run) and this amounts to a pay cut. I've calculated that the changes to my pension provision amount to a loss of £65,000. If someone broke into your house, trashed it, set fire to it on the way out and caused £65,000 worth of damage would you say: "Oh well, there's a recession on and burglars have to take difficult decisions?"[/p][/quote]No I wouldn't, but I wouldn't take it out on the kids next door either. You're supposed to be a teacher.[/p][/quote]Yes I am. As such I am not going to set an example to 'the kids next door' that they should just passively accept it when they are attacked like a bunch of doe-eyed wusses. Neither am I prepared to sit back and see the quality of schools and colleges deteriorate so that 'the kids next door' get a dumbed down education on the cheap.[/p][/quote]But you are prepared to see 'the kids next door' go short of food because their mother couldn't work when you were on strike and didn't get paid! Fez up man, you may not get as much pay as you'd like, but you aren't exactly poor. Just selfish.[/p][/quote]If the 'kids next door' are in a situation where they starve because their mother goes without one day's pay then I think you should be asking the question of why this mother has been forced into a situation of working for such meagre wages. Who is it exactly who supports a situation where wages are driven down to such an extent that children 'go without food' if their mother has a day off? It isn't the teachers but the very politicians and 'business leaders' who condemn the strike. Mark Goacher
  • Score: 1

4:39pm Thu 27 Mar 14

Mark Goacher says...

Jess Jephcott wrote:
Typical trade union attitude. Look after number one and sod the rest. If you don't like the job and the conditions of employment, go get another job. i would love the pension deal that you lot get at my expense.
Not my attitude at all. Could you please tell me how many parents do you think want their children to have second best in terms of education? You are correct when you say that prospective teachers who don't like the job may well get another job however it is not the teachers concerned that this damages but the parents and children who end up with a different Maths teacher every month or a History teacher with a third class degree who doesn't know what he or she is talking about.
[quote][p][bold]Jess Jephcott[/bold] wrote: Typical trade union attitude. Look after number one and sod the rest. If you don't like the job and the conditions of employment, go get another job. i would love the pension deal that you lot get at my expense.[/p][/quote]Not my attitude at all. Could you please tell me how many parents do you think want their children to have second best in terms of education? You are correct when you say that prospective teachers who don't like the job may well get another job however it is not the teachers concerned that this damages but the parents and children who end up with a different Maths teacher every month or a History teacher with a third class degree who doesn't know what he or she is talking about. Mark Goacher
  • Score: 2

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