Pair's app now focuses on cancelled trains

Pair's app now focuses on cancelled trains

Pair's app now focuses on cancelled trains

First published in News

A GROUNDBREAKING mobile phone app can now be used by commuters to claim compensation for cancelled trains.

Train Refunds was launched in January to help commuters claim back money if their train is delayed.

Now the app has been updated and users can also claim for cancelled trains.

The app covers 15 train lines across the UK, including Greater Anglia.

Since it launched, on January 20, it has recorded more than 8,000 downloads.

The updated app is available on iPhone and Android.

Comments (5)

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7:37pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Boris says...

Well done the now nameless pair (I think we were told their names when the original app was launched). I hope they are paying the Gazette for this advert.
Well done the now nameless pair (I think we were told their names when the original app was launched). I hope they are paying the Gazette for this advert. Boris
  • Score: -2

10:03pm Wed 26 Mar 14

whittle1 says...

Or use one of the other apps or websites that have been doing the same thing since 2012 on this line? Cracking bit of research Gazette.
Or use one of the other apps or websites that have been doing the same thing since 2012 on this line? Cracking bit of research Gazette. whittle1
  • Score: 1

11:44am Thu 27 Mar 14

Scoot says...

The question is can the train company prove if you were on that train ? No they can't so one could argue the app is aiding people to defraud the train company. If you are on a train thats delayed you know you are and fill out the forms accordingly.
The question is can the train company prove if you were on that train ? No they can't so one could argue the app is aiding people to defraud the train company. If you are on a train thats delayed you know you are and fill out the forms accordingly. Scoot
  • Score: 0

1:26pm Thu 27 Mar 14

Boris says...

Scoot wrote:
The question is can the train company prove if you were on that train ? No they can't so one could argue the app is aiding people to defraud the train company. If you are on a train thats delayed you know you are and fill out the forms accordingly.
I suppose the train company has done its risk analysis and has worked out how to tell if the applicant is telling the truth or not.
I hope they are not following the banks and handing out refunds willy-nilly to whoever asks for them.
[quote][p][bold]Scoot[/bold] wrote: The question is can the train company prove if you were on that train ? No they can't so one could argue the app is aiding people to defraud the train company. If you are on a train thats delayed you know you are and fill out the forms accordingly.[/p][/quote]I suppose the train company has done its risk analysis and has worked out how to tell if the applicant is telling the truth or not. I hope they are not following the banks and handing out refunds willy-nilly to whoever asks for them. Boris
  • Score: -1

1:45pm Thu 27 Mar 14

Scoot says...

Boris, the train company have no control over this, its somebodys 'lets get rich quick' idea. The train company will have umteen pay-delay forms from each delayed train. Even if someone was challenged all they need to say is 'I stopped off for a pint thats why I was late for my normal train' or 'I had to leave work early thats why I was on an early train'. The barriers don't record each ticket number. There will be those who will fraudulently claim and in the long run it will be the fair paying commuter whose ticket prices will go up who will have to pay for the fraud.
Boris, the train company have no control over this, its somebodys 'lets get rich quick' idea. The train company will have umteen pay-delay forms from each delayed train. Even if someone was challenged all they need to say is 'I stopped off for a pint thats why I was late for my normal train' or 'I had to leave work early thats why I was on an early train'. The barriers don't record each ticket number. There will be those who will fraudulently claim and in the long run it will be the fair paying commuter whose ticket prices will go up who will have to pay for the fraud. Scoot
  • Score: 0

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