Our struggle to lift ‘do not resuscitate’ hospital order on mum, 90

Gazette: Maisie Armstrong, 90. Maisie Armstrong, 90.

THE family of a 90-year-old woman are fighting to have an order instructing doctors not to resuscitate her lifted.

Maisie Armstrong was treated at Colchester General Hospital last year after problems with her remaining kidney.

When she was discharged, doctors put a “do not resuscitate’’ order on her file.

It means if she stops breathing, medics should not try to revive her.

But daughter Jane Blanes, 63, has challenged the order, saying her mum should be allowed to choose.

She said: “Mum has survived cancer, a stroke, a kidney operation and a lot of emotional turmoil. She has earned the right to choose for herself.”

Doctors and consultants are allowed to attach orders on patients after conducting a quality-of-life assessment.

FOR THE FULL STORY, SEE MONDAY'S GAZETTE

Comments (4)

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10:12am Mon 3 Feb 14

pixiebell87 says...

Doctors should not be allowed to make decisions like that without talking to the patient & patients family first!!
Doctors should not be allowed to make decisions like that without talking to the patient & patients family first!! pixiebell87
  • Score: 4

10:16am Mon 3 Feb 14

cynicalsubber says...

I can understand the emotional response to a DNR order, but do most people realise just how intrusive resuscitation is? It's not how it looks on an episode of Casualty, and it very rarely works. In this case, it's not as if the doctors are sending the lady to Dignitas, nor are they refusing to treat her if she gets ill, they've just said that if her heart stops for some reason, nature should be allowed to take its course.
My father was only 63 when doctors decided to make him the subject of a DNR, and when they explained the situation to me, I fully understood it and accepted it.
I can understand the emotional response to a DNR order, but do most people realise just how intrusive resuscitation is? It's not how it looks on an episode of Casualty, and it very rarely works. In this case, it's not as if the doctors are sending the lady to Dignitas, nor are they refusing to treat her if she gets ill, they've just said that if her heart stops for some reason, nature should be allowed to take its course. My father was only 63 when doctors decided to make him the subject of a DNR, and when they explained the situation to me, I fully understood it and accepted it. cynicalsubber
  • Score: 9

10:25am Mon 3 Feb 14

pixiebell87 says...

cynicalsubber wrote:
I can understand the emotional response to a DNR order, but do most people realise just how intrusive resuscitation is? It's not how it looks on an episode of Casualty, and it very rarely works. In this case, it's not as if the doctors are sending the lady to Dignitas, nor are they refusing to treat her if she gets ill, they've just said that if her heart stops for some reason, nature should be allowed to take its course.
My father was only 63 when doctors decided to make him the subject of a DNR, and when they explained the situation to me, I fully understood it and accepted it.
i agree with what you have said but sure you can see having been in the same situation that family imput is needed on a decision like that and should be respected. it cant just be on the say so of the doctors & family have to accept it xx
[quote][p][bold]cynicalsubber[/bold] wrote: I can understand the emotional response to a DNR order, but do most people realise just how intrusive resuscitation is? It's not how it looks on an episode of Casualty, and it very rarely works. In this case, it's not as if the doctors are sending the lady to Dignitas, nor are they refusing to treat her if she gets ill, they've just said that if her heart stops for some reason, nature should be allowed to take its course. My father was only 63 when doctors decided to make him the subject of a DNR, and when they explained the situation to me, I fully understood it and accepted it.[/p][/quote]i agree with what you have said but sure you can see having been in the same situation that family imput is needed on a decision like that and should be respected. it cant just be on the say so of the doctors & family have to accept it xx pixiebell87
  • Score: -3

1:08pm Mon 3 Feb 14

Scoot says...

This could make a lot of lawyers very rich indeed. Yes the doctors should discuss the matter with the patient before making the decision, but what if the patient is happy with the decision but a relative isn't ?
This could make a lot of lawyers very rich indeed. Yes the doctors should discuss the matter with the patient before making the decision, but what if the patient is happy with the decision but a relative isn't ? Scoot
  • Score: 5

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