Ambulance service launches turnaround plan

Ambulance service launches turnaround plan

Ambulance service launches turnaround plan

First published in News
Last updated
Gazette: Photograph of the Author by , Senior reporter

MORE frontline staff have been promised by the region's ambulance service.

The East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust has launched a transformation plan to tackle a crisis within the organisation.

Among its key aims are recruiting 351 more front line staff, increasing the number of double staffed ambulances, and improving management.

The turnaround plan, published today, is to address issues around clinical care and staff morale.

Comments (7)

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1:42pm Mon 22 Apr 13

jeffbridges says...

first of all, lets it be known I am full of praise for our East of England Ambulance Service.
due to statistics, we have here In Clacton and Its local areas, more than the average of elderly & Infirm/Ill residents.
we have paramedics from our East of England Ambulance Service local units who always seem to be quite close by in the event of urgent medical attention.
In the 10 years of residing here, I have had to call on 999 services just 3 times, but those 3 times were quick responding paramedics, that followed up with ambulance If needed.
Up untill now, our local service has been excellent.

For us locally, I just hope the old saying,
"If It `aint broke -
dont fix It"
comes to the fore.

I will also gratefully mention the air ambulance,
as we still attend ride outs that support the air ambulance with charitable contributions happily given.
we cannot under any circumstances, lose this most expensive, but very vital tool in rapid recovery of seriously Injured persons from point of accident to the nearest vital hospital appropiate for the patients needs.

Thank you
East of England Ambulance Service
first of all, lets it be known I am full of praise for our East of England Ambulance Service. due to statistics, we have here In Clacton and Its local areas, more than the average of elderly & Infirm/Ill residents. we have paramedics from our East of England Ambulance Service local units who always seem to be quite close by in the event of urgent medical attention. In the 10 years of residing here, I have had to call on 999 services just 3 times, but those 3 times were quick responding paramedics, that followed up with ambulance If needed. Up untill now, our local service has been excellent. For us locally, I just hope the old saying, "If It `aint broke - dont fix It" comes to the fore. I will also gratefully mention the air ambulance, as we still attend ride outs that support the air ambulance with charitable contributions happily given. we cannot under any circumstances, lose this most expensive, but very vital tool in rapid recovery of seriously Injured persons from point of accident to the nearest vital hospital appropiate for the patients needs. Thank you East of England Ambulance Service jeffbridges
  • Score: 1

2:36pm Mon 22 Apr 13

genhol says...

I think you'll find in the past 12 months the service is now on its knees and patients are regularly waiting more than an hour for emergency responses and other emergency sevices are covering the short fall
I think you'll find in the past 12 months the service is now on its knees and patients are regularly waiting more than an hour for emergency responses and other emergency sevices are covering the short fall genhol
  • Score: 3

2:54pm Mon 22 Apr 13

stopmoaning1 says...

genhol wrote:
I think you'll find in the past 12 months the service is now on its knees and patients are regularly waiting more than an hour for emergency responses and other emergency sevices are covering the short fall
Yes that’s absolutely true and it won’t change anytime soon. Unless these 351 new frontline staff are already trained and being ‘returned’ to frontline duties from other tasks, I think it will still be sometime yet before any new staff are recruited and trained.
A step in the right direction though.
[quote][p][bold]genhol[/bold] wrote: I think you'll find in the past 12 months the service is now on its knees and patients are regularly waiting more than an hour for emergency responses and other emergency sevices are covering the short fall[/p][/quote]Yes that’s absolutely true and it won’t change anytime soon. Unless these 351 new frontline staff are already trained and being ‘returned’ to frontline duties from other tasks, I think it will still be sometime yet before any new staff are recruited and trained. A step in the right direction though. stopmoaning1
  • Score: 2

3:09pm Mon 22 Apr 13

marybelle says...

I waited at the scene of a motor bike accident almost 1 hour for an ambulance to arrive to collect a guy who had a broken leg and other possible injuries so please don't tell me there isn't a problem.

It is the fault of the staff it's is the fault of lots of things.

Recently the service quite frankly has been awful I for one would not wait for an ambulance unless it was a back injury.
I waited at the scene of a motor bike accident almost 1 hour for an ambulance to arrive to collect a guy who had a broken leg and other possible injuries so please don't tell me there isn't a problem. It is the fault of the staff it's is the fault of lots of things. Recently the service quite frankly has been awful I for one would not wait for an ambulance unless it was a back injury. marybelle
  • Score: 1

4:59pm Mon 22 Apr 13

Witham1901 says...

All these new "Front line ambulance staff" - there is no mention of more Paramedics - the majority of these 351 staff are most likely to be Ambulance Care Assistants (ACA), who are pretty much glorified First Aiders. They can not give any drugs and they should pretty much be a driver for a paramedic, if they are used properly, but if and when there are ambulances that just have 2 of these ACA's, things are not going to end pretty. Yes, those who call 999 might get an ambulance quicker, but they aren't going to be getting very highly qualified personnel.

It's a cheaper way to get ambulances on the road - much like PCSO's in the Police Force - there to make the numbers up on a budget, but can't do very much.
All these new "Front line ambulance staff" - there is no mention of more Paramedics - the majority of these 351 staff are most likely to be Ambulance Care Assistants (ACA), who are pretty much glorified First Aiders. They can not give any drugs and they should pretty much be a driver for a paramedic, if they are used properly, but if and when there are ambulances that just have 2 of these ACA's, things are not going to end pretty. Yes, those who call 999 might get an ambulance quicker, but they aren't going to be getting very highly qualified personnel. It's a cheaper way to get ambulances on the road - much like PCSO's in the Police Force - there to make the numbers up on a budget, but can't do very much. Witham1901
  • Score: 0

7:39am Tue 23 Apr 13

Ian P says...

I am not suggesting that the Ambulance Service is squeeky clean, but I believe they take a lot of stick for other failings in the system. Go to any A&E and there is a good chance that at certain times you will see a queue of ambulances awaiting to off load patients because the are no available beds. Every ambulance in the queue means one less ambulance and crew to attend an emergency. As with any logistics process address the bottlenecks and the natural flow will take care of itself.
I am not suggesting that the Ambulance Service is squeeky clean, but I believe they take a lot of stick for other failings in the system. Go to any A&E and there is a good chance that at certain times you will see a queue of ambulances awaiting to off load patients because the are no available beds. Every ambulance in the queue means one less ambulance and crew to attend an emergency. As with any logistics process address the bottlenecks and the natural flow will take care of itself. Ian P
  • Score: 1

12:09pm Tue 23 Apr 13

perini says...

Ian P wrote:
I am not suggesting that the Ambulance Service is squeeky clean, but I believe they take a lot of stick for other failings in the system. Go to any A&E and there is a good chance that at certain times you will see a queue of ambulances awaiting to off load patients because the are no available beds. Every ambulance in the queue means one less ambulance and crew to attend an emergency. As with any logistics process address the bottlenecks and the natural flow will take care of itself.
Exactly - too many people using the Ambulance service as a free taxi! Too many people going to A&E with a cut finger, toothache and other trivial injuries that could and should be dealt with by using either common sense or their local GP.
[quote][p][bold]Ian P[/bold] wrote: I am not suggesting that the Ambulance Service is squeeky clean, but I believe they take a lot of stick for other failings in the system. Go to any A&E and there is a good chance that at certain times you will see a queue of ambulances awaiting to off load patients because the are no available beds. Every ambulance in the queue means one less ambulance and crew to attend an emergency. As with any logistics process address the bottlenecks and the natural flow will take care of itself.[/p][/quote]Exactly - too many people using the Ambulance service as a free taxi! Too many people going to A&E with a cut finger, toothache and other trivial injuries that could and should be dealt with by using either common sense or their local GP. perini
  • Score: 0

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