Colchester: New role for director of nursing

First published in News by

THE director of nursing and patient experience at Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust has been appointed to a new job.
Julie Firth’s role with NHS England (Midlands and East) starts on Monday.

Dr Gordon Coutts, trust chief executive, said: “I am pleased to announce Julie’s appointment to the newly-created NHS England (Midlands and East) where she will join the regional chief nurse, Ruth May, and her senior leadership team to provide strategic leadership help to the regional nursing agenda.
“Julie has been asked to support the implementation of the findings from the Francis Report from a nursing perspective. I am delighted that she can add her extensive nursing experience to this critical work.”
Mrs Firth joined the trust, which runs Colchester General Hospital and Essex County Hospital, in 2009.

 

Comments (3)

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1:51pm Thu 18 Apr 13

stevedawson says...

Birt speak!
Birt speak! stevedawson
  • Score: 0

3:22pm Thu 18 Apr 13

rhetoric says...

Just what is needed! Another heavy layer of cost on the top of the already overloaded executive pile.
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As the NHS faces stress and shortages, might it not be better to put the money into the "coalface", ie where the patients are supposed to be receiving care and consideration? Ok, it's just a drop in the ocean there, but to someone or some people it might be the drop that saves their life/lives.
.
Just what is needed! Another heavy layer of cost on the top of the already overloaded executive pile. . As the NHS faces stress and shortages, might it not be better to put the money into the "coalface", ie where the patients are supposed to be receiving care and consideration? Ok, it's just a drop in the ocean there, but to someone or some people it might be the drop that saves their life/lives. . rhetoric
  • Score: 0

10:35pm Thu 16 May 13

TheTransporter says...

Cronyism is partiality to long-standing friends, especially by appointing them to positions of authority, regardless of their qualifications. Hence, cronyism is contrary in practice and principle to meritocracy.
Cronyism exists when the appointer and the beneficiary are in social contact; often, the appointer is inadequate to hold his or her own job or position of authority, and for this reason the appointer appoints individuals who will not try to weaken him or her, or express views contrary to those of the appointer. Politically, "cronyism" is derogatorily used.
Nepotism is favoritism granted to relatives regardless of merit. The word nepotism is from the Latin word nepos, nepotis (m. "nephew"), from which modern Romanian nepot and Italian nipote and Catalan nebot, "nephew" or "grandchild" are also descended. For example, Romanian Communist dictator Nicolae Ceaușescu filled the top posts in the country and the ruling Party with his siblings, nephews, nieces, and in-laws, as well as giving increasing power to his wife, Elena—she officially held the title of Deputy Prime Minister, and by the early 1980s she was placed in charge of the country when Nicolae was away on tours abroad.
Cronyism is partiality to long-standing friends, especially by appointing them to positions of authority, regardless of their qualifications. Hence, cronyism is contrary in practice and principle to meritocracy. Cronyism exists when the appointer and the beneficiary are in social contact; often, the appointer is inadequate to hold his or her own job or position of authority, and for this reason the appointer appoints individuals who will not try to weaken him or her, or express views contrary to those of the appointer. Politically, "cronyism" is derogatorily used.[1] Nepotism is favoritism granted to relatives regardless of merit.[1] The word nepotism is from the Latin word nepos, nepotis (m. "nephew"), from which modern Romanian nepot and Italian nipote and Catalan nebot, "nephew" or "grandchild" are also descended. For example, Romanian Communist dictator Nicolae Ceaușescu filled the top posts in the country and the ruling Party with his siblings, nephews, nieces, and in-laws, as well as giving increasing power to his wife, Elena—she officially held the title of Deputy Prime Minister, and by the early 1980s she was placed in charge of the country when Nicolae was away on tours abroad. TheTransporter
  • Score: 0

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