Game on for top pupil Shaney-Lee

Gazette: Dave Thomas, store manager of the Sainsbury's town centre branch, presents the PS3 to Shaney-Lee Rolfe. Dave Thomas, store manager of the Sainsbury's town centre branch, presents the PS3 to Shaney-Lee Rolfe.

A DILIGENT pupil who went to school every day last term was rewarded with a games console.

Shaney-Lee Rolfe had 100 per cent attendance at St Andrew’s Infant School, in Hickory Avenue, Greenstead, during the autumn term.

As a reward Shaney-Lee, six, was given a Playstation 3 after being drawn at random from everyone who had full attendance.

The competition was organised by headteacher Melody Lowe as a new way to improve school attendance.

Sainsbury’s Colchester donated the prize and Lisa Simister, HR manager at Sainsbury’s, said: “It has been really good supporting St Andrew’s School and anything we can do which helps make a difference to these children we will continue to do. We hope to be able to support and hold yearly award ceremonies with the school to help raise aspirations in different ways in the future.”

Comments (13)

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4:44pm Sat 28 Dec 13

Jack222 says...

Why are students rewarded for doing the right thing? It should be expected.
Why are students rewarded for doing the right thing? It should be expected. Jack222

5:55pm Sat 28 Dec 13

thehappyholly89 says...

Hmm yeh give her a reason not to do homework why dont you? Pupils shouldnt be rewarded for going to school they should be punished not to unless for valid reasons!
Hmm yeh give her a reason not to do homework why dont you? Pupils shouldnt be rewarded for going to school they should be punished not to unless for valid reasons! thehappyholly89

6:21pm Sat 28 Dec 13

pixiebell87 says...

well done school what a great way to create jealousy amongst class mate who dont own such luxuries as playstation 3's!!!!
well done school what a great way to create jealousy amongst class mate who dont own such luxuries as playstation 3's!!!! pixiebell87

6:23pm Sat 28 Dec 13

greenbroker says...

I remember attending the Gilberd School sometime ago to see my son receive an award for what I considered very worthy. It became a complete farce and waste of time when just about every pupil received an award for just about anything. It's all to do with the equality thing.......
I remember attending the Gilberd School sometime ago to see my son receive an award for what I considered very worthy. It became a complete farce and waste of time when just about every pupil received an award for just about anything. It's all to do with the equality thing....... greenbroker

8:15pm Sat 28 Dec 13

Fnagster says...

Jack222 wrote:
Why are students rewarded for doing the right thing? It should be expected.
I guess all readers who agree with that will be returning any Christmas bonus they got this year?

I think it's a great idea, surely anything that encourages kids to go to school instead of bunking off must be a good thing.
[quote][p][bold]Jack222[/bold] wrote: Why are students rewarded for doing the right thing? It should be expected.[/p][/quote]I guess all readers who agree with that will be returning any Christmas bonus they got this year? I think it's a great idea, surely anything that encourages kids to go to school instead of bunking off must be a good thing. Fnagster

9:21pm Sat 28 Dec 13

Noah4x4 says...

I favour incentives for outstanding performance rather than punishment for weakness; be that in school; work; sport or wherever; but not if the reward is then the product of a lottery and hence there are more losers than winners.

The parents of the other children that also had 100% records will now have disappointed six year olds also expecting to receive a Play Station; if not in this term;perhaps in the following term or that after. It is unsustainable. Holding a lottery to determine the SOLE winner must eventually send the wrong signal that luck is more important than hard work and diligence.

As a child of the fifties and (then) having been scared of teachers and police (as the occasional victim of the cane or slipper); I can understand the psychology and desire NOT to return to former violent forms of youth discipline. But I can also see the logic of punishing ALL (perhaps a class detention?) until a culprit comes forward in cases of bad behaviour and/or rewarding ALL if a class (say) collectively achieves say 90% attendance. But this has gone much too far in the opposite direction.
I favour incentives for outstanding performance rather than punishment for weakness; be that in school; work; sport or wherever; but not if the reward is then the product of a lottery and hence there are more losers than winners. The parents of the other children that also had 100% records will now have disappointed six year olds also expecting to receive a Play Station; if not in this term;perhaps in the following term or that after. It is unsustainable. Holding a lottery to determine the SOLE winner must eventually send the wrong signal that luck is more important than hard work and diligence. As a child of the fifties and (then) having been scared of teachers and police (as the occasional victim of the cane or slipper); I can understand the psychology and desire NOT to return to former violent forms of youth discipline. But I can also see the logic of punishing ALL (perhaps a class detention?) until a culprit comes forward in cases of bad behaviour and/or rewarding ALL if a class (say) collectively achieves say 90% attendance. But this has gone much too far in the opposite direction. Noah4x4

9:57pm Sat 28 Dec 13

Boris says...

Would have been nice to know how many pupils achieved 100% attendance, and how that compared with the same term the previous year.
The child is not a top pupil, she is one of many top pupils. She won the prize in the same way as anyone winning a raffle, and I don't remember anyone begrudging a raffle prize when I was a child.
Congratulations Shaney-Lee, enjoy your prize, and tell your parents not to let you play with it for more than 45 minutes per day during term time.
Would have been nice to know how many pupils achieved 100% attendance, and how that compared with the same term the previous year. The child is not a top pupil, she is one of many top pupils. She won the prize in the same way as anyone winning a raffle, and I don't remember anyone begrudging a raffle prize when I was a child. Congratulations Shaney-Lee, enjoy your prize, and tell your parents not to let you play with it for more than 45 minutes per day during term time. Boris

9:59pm Sat 28 Dec 13

jut1972 says...

Don't listen to these moaning old ninnies. .. congratulations!
Don't listen to these moaning old ninnies. .. congratulations! jut1972

6:51am Sun 29 Dec 13

Mail Member 4 Colchester says...

greenbroker wrote:
I remember attending the Gilberd School sometime ago to see my son receive an award for what I considered very worthy. It became a complete farce and waste of time when just about every pupil received an award for just about anything. It's all to do with the equality thing.......
Exactly, greenbroker, it's bloody political correctness gone mad, is what it is. This girl qualifying for, and winning, a raffle prize, only a mad man would fail to see how it's all to with this 'equality' stuff, trying to tell poor people, women, and ethnics, they're as good as people like us. She should be coming home from school, as a 6 year old, with so much homework that she never has any time for play.
[quote][p][bold]greenbroker[/bold] wrote: I remember attending the Gilberd School sometime ago to see my son receive an award for what I considered very worthy. It became a complete farce and waste of time when just about every pupil received an award for just about anything. It's all to do with the equality thing.......[/p][/quote]Exactly, greenbroker, it's bloody political correctness gone mad, is what it is. This girl qualifying for, and winning, a raffle prize, only a mad man would fail to see how it's all to with this 'equality' stuff, trying to tell poor people, women, and ethnics, they're as good as people like us. She should be coming home from school, as a 6 year old, with so much homework that she never has any time for play. Mail Member 4 Colchester

9:01am Sun 29 Dec 13

Say It As It Is OK? says...

Most commentators are against this type of incentive, particularly for such young children many reasons and I think it's a dangerous president that most probably will cause more angst than good. Therefore, it fall by the wayside because it won't be commercially viable for Sainsburys to extend across all junior schools, three times a year, which would be the fairest thing to do.

The ugly part is the blatant approach by Sainsburys by turning this into a marketing and advertising event just for their publicity. (note the strategically placed carrier bag, for all to see). disgraceful!
Most commentators are against this type of incentive, particularly for such young children many reasons and I think it's a dangerous president that most probably will cause more angst than good. Therefore, it fall by the wayside because it won't be commercially viable for Sainsburys to extend across all junior schools, three times a year, which would be the fairest thing to do. The ugly part is the blatant approach by Sainsburys by turning this into a marketing and advertising event just for their publicity. (note the strategically placed carrier bag, for all to see). disgraceful! Say It As It Is OK?

10:01am Sun 29 Dec 13

No! I am Spartacus says...

Hmm... my 7 year old and 9 year olds (in a different school) were also 100% attendees and I'll admit a prize win is always nice, but surely it holds more value for good work rather than carrying out the most basic of tasks... attending.

What next, a cash windfall for Lords just because they turned up to the House of Lords....? Errr...
Hmm... my 7 year old and 9 year olds (in a different school) were also 100% attendees and I'll admit a prize win is always nice, but surely it holds more value for good work rather than carrying out the most basic of tasks... attending. What next, a cash windfall for Lords just because they turned up to the House of Lords....? Errr... No! I am Spartacus

7:58am Mon 30 Dec 13

rhetoric says...

Book tokens for the whole class might have been less controversial, and bring an interest in reading to some of those who otherwise spend their time on various screens, playing fairly 'rubbish' games Of course that would not have been so exciting for today's child, but at least would have ackdnowledged that they had done something worthwhile and were being fairly and justly rewarded for that.
.
Books inform us of possibilities beyond our narrow little personal worlds,
.
Of course, tokens would not bring such sensational publicity for the Superstore, but dilute the donation down to non-newsworthiness.
Book tokens for the whole class might have been less controversial, and bring an interest in reading to some of those who otherwise spend their time on various screens, playing fairly 'rubbish' games Of course that would not have been so exciting for today's child, but at least would have ackdnowledged that they had done something worthwhile and were being fairly and justly rewarded for that. . Books inform us of possibilities beyond our narrow little personal worlds, . Of course, tokens would not bring such sensational publicity for the Superstore, but dilute the donation down to non-newsworthiness. rhetoric

10:40pm Mon 30 Dec 13

Boris says...

rhetoric wrote:
Book tokens for the whole class might have been less controversial, and bring an interest in reading to some of those who otherwise spend their time on various screens, playing fairly 'rubbish' games Of course that would not have been so exciting for today's child, but at least would have ackdnowledged that they had done something worthwhile and were being fairly and justly rewarded for that.
.
Books inform us of possibilities beyond our narrow little personal worlds,
.
Of course, tokens would not bring such sensational publicity for the Superstore, but dilute the donation down to non-newsworthiness.
Good idea, but who is going to sponsor the award of dozens, maybe hundreds, of book tokens?
[quote][p][bold]rhetoric[/bold] wrote: Book tokens for the whole class might have been less controversial, and bring an interest in reading to some of those who otherwise spend their time on various screens, playing fairly 'rubbish' games Of course that would not have been so exciting for today's child, but at least would have ackdnowledged that they had done something worthwhile and were being fairly and justly rewarded for that. . Books inform us of possibilities beyond our narrow little personal worlds, . Of course, tokens would not bring such sensational publicity for the Superstore, but dilute the donation down to non-newsworthiness.[/p][/quote]Good idea, but who is going to sponsor the award of dozens, maybe hundreds, of book tokens? Boris

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